Monthly Archives: August 2017

Go Vs. Goes – Learn the Difference within a Minute

Grammar check

We all wish to feel proud going with accurate English while speaking or writing. Though, it is a stylish language, but complicated as well. If you do not know the difference between “Go” and “Goes”, it may lead to blunders. Here, we are going to emphasize the difference in a discreet manner.

Basic Things of “Go” and “Goes” –

  • First, “Go” and “Goes” are both associated with a verb form which is “go”. It becomes “Went” in the past.  When it is about continuous, “ING” is added to the form.

The form “go” is used with a subjective plural case, while “goes” comes up with a subjective singular case.

Correct grammar

Check Out the Examples “Go” and “Goes” –

The fact cannot be ignored that it is one of the most asked things among the beginners wishes to have a great hold on grammar. And it comes at the very start of the Tenses. If you understand it in a discreet way, you will never get confused regarding it. And that is why it is quite essential to understand it. Let’s understand the difference between Go and Goes through examples.

  • First person (singular): I go to the gym every day.
  • First person (plural): We go to acting classes’ every day.
  • Second person (singular/plural): You/you people go to MacD every day to have their favourite burger.
  • Subjective third person (plural): They go to the theatre bunking their classes.

Present Indefinite Tense –

Do you remember about Present Indefinite Tense? If you are a bit confused then let’s revise it once again.

Present Indefinite Positive Tense means the first form of the verb is used with “S” and “Es”. We use “S” when it is the singular subject like He, She, It or Names. On the other hand, “Es” is used with the Plural subject like We, They, I, You etc.

Structure of Present Indefinite Tense-

Let’s check it out what is all about the Structure of Present Indefinite Tense-

  • For Singular- 

Subject + Verb (With ‘S’ or ‘Es’) + Object.

Example :

  • Nandini goes to the office every day.
  • He plays football very well.
  • She cooks tasty food.
  • For Plural-

Subject + Verb + Object.

  • We go to Spa every Sunday with friends.
  • They go to the garden to have a lot of fun.

We expect that you have now understood the difference between “Go” and “Goes” and where they are used. In case, if you are still confused what you need to do is go for using Nounplus. Within a short span of time, it has become quite popular.

It is a free tool where you can paste your stuff and gets it accurate without having any grammar mistakes. These days, it is being used on a large scale by the professionals, teachers, and students. It is free software and nothing is charged from you. It is quite easy to use.

For more information: visit our blog. Additionally, you can download our mobile apps on Google play store or App store. Feel free to contact us with any questions! Follow us on Facebook or Twitter.com.

Which is the correct grammar usage: ” a unique” or “an unique”?

correct grammar usage

In written English, many people make many mistakes, but in speaking these mistakes cannot be caught by many. But when a content is read by someone there are many chances of identifying of the mistakes.

Many learners and kids always get confused in using “a” and “an”. Sometimes they put “an” with consonant sounding words and sometimes “a” with vowel sounding words. When kids or other learners, learn using the difference between consonant and vowel sometimes they get confused between sound and words.

For example- “unit” is a consonant word, but it is starting with “u” then how “a” can be used ahead of it and if it is starting with U then it is vowel word because U is a vowel, right?

U is a vowel word, but in “unit” it sounds as “yoo” which is not a vowel sounding word.So right answer will be – “a unit”.

For putting “a and an” ahead of any singular word we need to see that the word’s initial sound is sounding as vowel sound or consonants.

What are vowels? A simple answer to this question is-

A, E, I, O and U. These are vowels.

No, the answer is not correct, these above words are vowels, but they are not words they are vowel sounding words. “An” can only be put ahead of those words which are not starting with vowels, but the word’s initial letter or first letter has the vowel sound.

For example- “an honor”,  the word is starting with a consonant, but the first letter of the word “h” is silent here, so the initial sound of the word is “o” which is a vowel sound, that is why we have put “an” ahead of it.

Why “a one-eyed” and “a Europe”?

 In “a one-eyed” one is starting with “O” which is a vowel and similarly in “Europe”, then according to rule “O” and “E” are vowel sounding words then why “a” used head of it. The answer is so simple because one and Europe is might be starting with vowel words, but they have sounded as “W” in one and “Y” in Europe as in “won” and “you”.

There some examples of words which are starting with vowels, but sounds as consonant-

Words have initial sound as “yoo or you”-

­_a unit_, (u-you)

_a unique object_, (u-you)

_a utility_, (u-you)

_a useful thing_, (u-you)

_a university_, (u-you)

_a use_, (u-you)

_a one-time thing_, (u-you)

_a one-eyed dog_, (u-you)

_a European_. (u-you)

An H_ (“an” can be use before H)

Yes, “an” can be used before H, if the H is in starting with the word and it is silent, as in-

_an heir_,

_an hour_,

_an honor_,

_an honest man_.

A  H_

If H is the first letter of any word and it is not silent, then “A” use ahead of it. For example,

­_a hourse_

_a hen_

_a house_

_a hole_

” A unique” or “An unique”?

So, the answer to the very first question now may be readers after reading this can understand.

In “unique” U is vowel word, but in this U sound as “yoo” or “you” which is consonant sound. So, unique is not starting with a vowel sound, using “an” ahead of it will be wrong.

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